faculty_blog_header_fall

EDITOR'S NOTE: For more on the subject of "incarnational ministry," see the blog of Dr. Kyuboem Lee yesterday {January 9}.

The mission statement of Biblical Seminary says that we exist to prepare “missional leaders who incarnate the story of Jesus with humility and authenticity and communicate the story with fidelity to Scripture . . . .” Of course technically and theologically we may only speak of one unique incarnation—that of second person of the Trinity who in the fullness of time was born a man for our salvation.  “The Word became flesh,” as John tells us (Jn. 1:14).

So when we speak of preparing leaders who incarnate the story of Jesus we are speaking metaphorically.  We are saying that as the invisible Word took visible human form and concretely demonstrated the power, truth, and goodness of the coming Kingdom, so today we need more Christians who are committed not merely totelling the gospel (as important as that is) but also to  embodying the gospel.  There are two obvious reasons for this.

First, we live in a very cynical age.  We are surrounded by hype; we are used to being over-sold. People are suspicious that the good news just sounds too good.  And if truth be told, Christians are sometimes guilty of unrealistically positive presentations of what is means to follow Jesus.  In other words, we are the source of some of the anti-Christian cynicism we deplore.

But the second reason we talk about incarnating the gospel is that Christians, particularly those of a more conservative stripe, have allowed a disconnect between word and deed. While paying lip service to the importance of obedience and discipleship, we have focused more of our attention on the correct form of word and doctrine. The tendency has been to value the message more highly than the messenger.

When we talk about preparing leaders who incarnate the gospel, we remind ourselves that in Jesus there was no separation of the message from the messenger, no disconnect of word and deed. We want to prepare leaders who look more like Jesus.

 
Dave Dunbar is president of Biblical Seminary.  He has been married to Sharon for 42 years.  They have four grown children and six grand childreen

Add comment


Security code
Refresh

Blog Mission

The purpose of this blog will be to expand the influence of our faculty, maintain contact with our graduates, and invite other friends to think with us about important biblical and theological ideas.

Biblical's Faculty

Biblical’s Faculty:

We are committed to ongoing engagement with culture and the world for the sake of our witness to the Gospel, and to continual learning from Christians in other cultural settings.

Latest Blog Entries

Written on 25 November 2014 - by R. Todd Mangum
Written on 19 November 2014 - by Steve Taylor
Written on 17 November 2014 - by Stephen Taylor
Written on 14 November 2014 - by Charles Zimmerman
Written on 07 November 2014 - by Susan Disston and Jennifer Zuck
Written on 03 November 2014 - by Drew Hart
Written on 22 October 2014 - by Dr. Dave Dunbar
Written on 20 October 2014 - by Philip Monroe
Written on 17 October 2014 - by Bryan Maier
Written on 13 October 2014 - by R. Todd Mangum

Previous Blog Entries

Follow Biblical

Follow us on the following sites and receive notifications on upcoming events and blog entries:

Follow Biblical on facebookFollow Biblical on Twitterg+_64_black

Contact Admissions

800.235.4021 x146

215.368.5000 x146

215.368.4913 (fax)

 

admissions@biblical.edu

Stay Connected with Biblical

Follow us on the following sites:

Follow Biblical on facebookFollow Biblical on TwitterFollow Biblical on YouTubeg+_64_black
Or simply call us at...
800.235.4021 x146 or 215.368.5000 x146

Support Biblical by Giving

800.235.4021 x162

215.368.5000 x162

215.368.7002 (fax)

 

development@biblical.edu

Home